Just sculptures...

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02/19/18 - As we face the 21st century it’s easy to suppose that certain expressions in the visual arts are outdated. However, some artists still explore traditional mediums, such as figurative sculpture. With this in mind, the Skarstedt Gallery in New York gathered modern and contemporary pieces by creators that still believe in expressing themselves through figures. The exhibition is entitled  "Approaching The Figure" and each artist is able to display their individuality. From a childish image to a wounded deer, each object produces an array of emotions, from humor to sadness, but always with utmost respect.

Bear and Policeman, by Jeff Koons (1988)
Material: painted wood / Measures: 215,8 x 109,2 x 91,4 cm
Let’s start with the very popular "Bear and Policeman" from the 1998 series Banality by Jeff Koons. The 2-mts-tall piece is a true example of the way the artist combines cartoons with human beings. Its huge scale magnifies the emotions of the visitors, confronting imagination with reality.
BFF, by Kaws (2016)
Material: painted bronze / Measures: 243,8 x 103,1x 62,7 cm
This sculpture by Brian Donnelly (USA, 1974), known as Kaws, is exhibited for the first time. As with all of his characters, this one is also half human, half animal, has an X for eyes and a pink nose. Done in bronze, with painted details in the face, BFF looks as if born from a graffiti, bringing an urban approach to the exhibition. Kaws moves away from the traditional speech surrounding the sculpture, a technique historically reserved for the highest academic practice.

Ten Breaths: Tumbling Woman II, by Eric Fischl (2007)
Material: bronze / Measures: 64,8 x 120,7 x 66 cm
This sculpture by Brian Donnelly (USA, 1974), known as Kaws, is exhibited for the first time. As with all of his characters, this one is also half human, half animal, has an X for eyes and a pink nose. Done in bronze, with painted details in the face, BFF looks as if born from a graffiti, bringing an urban approach to the exhibition. Kaws moves away from the traditional speech surrounding the sculpture, a technique historically reserved for the highest academic practice.
Creature of Habit 2 (Deer), by Rosemarie Trockel (1990)
Material: Bronze / Measures: 20,3 x 121,9 x 78,7 cm
In another room, a small lying deer  leads us once again into sadness. However, according to the artist, it represents death and life in the circle of Nature.
This exhibition showcases the works of a group of artist with a unique style. Each one of the pieces produces a different feeling and makes us reconsider the figure as an expression in the 21st Century.

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Contents

Liliana Wrobel


Production & Translation

Carla Mitrani

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